The AAUP and Educational Technology

The AAUP and Educational Technology: Weathering the Digital Storm

Technology is changing relationships between and among faculty, students, the curriculum, modes of information delivery, and the assessment of learning and teaching. The AAUP serves as a forum for faculty colleagues as we react to technological innovations and their impact in our classrooms, whether they be on campus or in the digital cloud.

David Stoloff (Eastern Connecticut State University) – stoloffd@easternct.edu

A presentation at the annual meeting of the American Association of University Professors, June 11, 2015, Washington, DC.

citation:

Stoloff, D.L. (June 11, 2015).  The AAUP and Educational Technology: Weathering the Digital Storm.  Retrieved from https://writingsdls.wordpress.com/aaupjune2015/

Abstract:

After a brief review of AAUP’s past reactions and recent presentations at annual meetings on distance learning and educational technology, we will engage in a lively discussion on how learners and faculty will react to the coming “learner revolution.”   What will be the reactions of AAUP, our individual institutions, disciplines, and faculty members to these changes in how students may access learning and credit for their own professional development?

For context, the session will briefly overview the AAUP’s 1999 statement on distance education and intellectual property issues, the AAUP Counsel statement on these issues in 2000, and articles in Academe on MOOCs, student-centered institutions, new-media literacies, and the role of technology to expand academic offering in the 1950s. Additional connections will be made for this discussion through reference to Green’s (2013) presentation on higher educational and instructional technology.

AAUP Special Committee on Distance Education and Intellectual Property Issues (March 1999, endorsed at AAUP national conference June 1999). Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/report/statement-distance-education

Euben, Donna R. (April 2000).   Faculty Rights and Responsibilities in Distance Learning. Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/faculty-rights-and-responsibilities-distance-learning-2000

Martin, Wendy and Harris, Jed (May-June 2014). From Bureaucratic Entropy to Student-Centered Institutions. Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/article/bureaucratic-entropy-student-centered-institutions#.VH8_nYVf9qk

… if online course materials such as lectures, quizzes, readings, and simulated experiments are used primarily to reduce instructional costs, with no corresponding shift in institutional priorities, they are likely to harm students and reduce the value of the institution’s brand. But if they are used for increased individual coaching and mentoring, performance feedback, and more intensive personalization of each student’s educational pathway, these materials can greatly benefit students and improve an institution’s brand.

Ohler, Jason (May-June 2009). New-Media Literacies. Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/article/new-media-literacies#.VH8_4YVf9qk

Rees, Jonathan (May-June 2014). More than MOOCs: What are the risks for academic freedom? Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/article/more-moocs#.VH8_bIVf9qk

The discussion will then turn to challenges to the status quo of higher education. AAUP’s 2014 participation in the Teaching Millions or Making Millions? Campaign for the Future of Higher Education will introduce what others are planning for higher education. Van Der Werf (2014) envisions that 8 growth areas in “credit portability, 21st century skill assessment, competency-based credit, personal learner coaching, facilitated peer learning, real-world learning labs, skills-specific academies, and adaptive learning and feedback” will “crack the traditional system’s credit-hour stranglehold” by “using predictive modeling to determine which students need interventions, and what kind of interventions are most likely to work.” In Hire Education, Weise and Christensen (2014) find that there is a “critical convergence of two major vectors: robust advancements in technology and a growing set of nonconsumers of higher education who are not finding what they need to progress through traditional forms of education.”

Campaign for the Future of Higher Education and FutureofHigherEd.org (May 13, 2014). Teaching Millions or Making Millions? Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/news/teaching-millions-or-making-millions or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vkKPt0Aacg

Van Der Werf, Martin (2014). The Ed Tech Revolution is about to Become the Learner Revolution. Retrieved from http://eddesignlab.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/LearnerRevolution_EducationDesignLab.pdf

Weise, Michelle R. and Christensen, Clayton M. (July 2014). Hire Education Mastery, Modularization, and the Workforce Revolution. Retrieved from http://www.christenseninstitute.org/publications/hire/#sthash.JbZRK5hf.dpuf

Our discussion will focus on examples of the intrusion of business/top down interests on higher education practices, how local and state chapters are reacting to these challenges, and how grassroot reactions have stemmed some of the challenging directions of these initiatives. Recognizing the potential of these tools, there will also be some time for discussion of the positive applications of educational technology to enhance learning and teaching. A goal of this discussion would be to develop an interest/support group to build collaborative strategies and actions across the AAUP to participate in guiding the careful implementation of technology to enhance learning and teaching goals, to safeguard the academic profession, and to assure that the university continues to serve and influence individual and societal development for a more equitable and safe world.

Three recent issues:

1) Who will benefit from online courses?

June, Audrey Williams.   (June 19, 2014).  Will ASU Online’s Starbucks Baristas Outearn Their Professors?   Retrieved from http://0-chronicle.com.www.consuls.org/article/Will-ASU-Online-s-Starbucks/147239/#sthash.zUrOOEwB.dpuf

This is a major PR boost for ASU as well, and considering many adjuncts make less than the baristas they’ll be teaching, I doubt ASU is losing money here. —Steve Foerster

2) Limitations or requirements for online courses –

NEASC/CIHE Guidelines for the Evaluation of Distance Education (On-line Learning)
9. The institution assures the integrity of its on-line learning offerings.
Examples of evidence:
a. The institution has in place effective procedures through which to ensure that the
student who registers in a distance education course or program is the same student
who participates in and completes the course or program and receives the academic
credit. The institution makes clear in writing that these processes protect student
privacy and notifies students at the time of registration or enrollment of any projected
additional costs associated with the verification procedures.
(Note: This is a federal requirement. All institutions that offer distance education programming must demonstrate compliance with this requirement.)
   —
NEASC/CIHE (New England Association of Schools and Colleges and Commission on Institutions of Higher Education) (April 2013).   Guidelines for the Evaluation of Distance Education (On-line Learning).  Retrieved from https://cihe.neasc.org/sites/cihe.neasc.org/downloads/POLICIES/Pp90_Guidelines_for_the_Evaluation_of_Distance_Education__On-line_Learning_.pdf
 —
Substantive change proposals – offering certificates or degrees where 50% or more can be taken entirely on-line –
 —
NEASC/CIHE (New England Association of Schools and Colleges and Cpmmission on Institutions of Higher Education) (April 2013).  Substantive Change Proposals.  Retrieved from https://cihe.neasc.org/institutional-reports-resources/reporting-guidelines/substantive-change-proposals
 —
Fischer, Karin (November 21, 2013).   Saudi Restrictions on Online Courses Leave U.S. Colleges Guessing.  Retrieved from http://0-chronicle.com.www.consuls.org/article/Saudi-Limits-on-Online-Courses/143193/#sthash.CQNZlnKU.dpuf
 —
Saudi Arabia [is] the fourth-largest source of foreign students and one of the fastest-growing…the Saudi government did not generally want students overseas to take courses online, as it runs counter to one of the central goals of the scholarship program—exposing young Saudis to a new academic and cultural environment.
 —
Carnevale, Dan (January 6, 2006).  Michigan Considers Requiring Online Course for High-School Students.  Required from http://0-chronicle.com.www.consuls.org/article/Michigan-Considers-Requiring/4158#sthash.sG8WY98b.dpuf


The Michigan State Board of Education approved a new graduation requirement in December that would make every high-school student in the state take at least one online course before receiving a diploma.

3) State control of online learning across borders
 —
Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) (2015).  WICHE-State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (W-SARA).  Retrieved from http://www.wiche.edu/sara
 —

Webliography

AAUP Special Committee on Distance Education and Intellectual Property Issues (March 1999, endorsed at AAUP national conference June 1999). Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/report/statement-distance-education

Ron Bethke (December 02, 2014). Learner Revolution in, Ed Tech Revolution out.   Retrieved from http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/learner-revolution-invest-522/

Campaign for the Future of Higher Education and FutureofHigherEd.org (May 13, 2014). Teaching Millions or Making Millions? Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/news/teaching-millions-or-making-millions or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vkKPt0Aacg

Carnevale, Dan (January 6, 2006).  Michigan Considers Requiring Online Course for High-School Students.  Required from http://0-chronicle.com.www.consuls.org/article/Michigan-Considers-Requiring/4158#sthash.sG8WY98b.dpuf

Euben, Donna R. (April 2000).   Faculty Rights and Responsibilities in Distance Learning. Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/faculty-rights-and-responsibilities-distance-learning-2000

Fischer, Karin (November 21, 2013).   Saudi Restrictions on Online Courses Leave U.S. Colleges Guessing.  Retrieved from http://0-chronicle.com.www.consuls.org/article/Saudi-Limits-on-Online-Courses/143193/#sthash.CQNZlnKU.dpuf

Green, Kenneth C. (June 2013).   The Campus Computing Project. Retrieved from http://www.campuscomputing.net/sites/www.campuscomputing.net/files/GREEN-AttentionMustBePaid-AAUP-June%202013_0.pdf

June, Audrey Williams.   (June 19, 2014).  Will ASU Online’s Starbucks Baristas Outearn Their Professors?   Retrieved from http://0-chronicle.com.www.consuls.org/article/Will-ASU-Online-s-Starbucks/147239/#sthash.zUrOOEwB.dpuf

Martin, Wendy and Harris, Jed (May-June 2014). From Bureaucratic Entropy to Student-Centered Institutions. Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/article/bureaucratic-entropy-student-centered-institutions#.VH8_nYVf9qk

NEASC/CIHE (New England Association of Schools and Colleges and Cpmmission on Institutions of Higher Education) (April 2013).  Substantive Change Proposals.  Retrieved from https://cihe.neasc.org/institutional-reports-resources/reporting-guidelines/substantive-change-proposals

Ohler, Jason (May-June 2009). New-Media Literacies. Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/article/new-media-literacies#.VH8_4YVf9qk

Rees, Jonathan (May-June 2014). More than MOOCs: What are the risks for academic freedom? Retrieved from http://www.aaup.org/article/more-moocs#.VH8_bIVf9qk

Van Der Werf, Martin (2014). The Ed Tech Revolution is about to Become the Learner Revolution. Retrieved from http://eddesignlab.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/LearnerRevolution_EducationDesignLab.pdf

Weise, Michelle R. and Christensen, Clayton M. (July 2014). Hire Education Mastery, Modularization, and the Workforce Revolution. Retrieved from http://www.christenseninstitute.org/publications/hire/#sthash.JbZRK5hf.dpuf

 Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) (2015).  WICHE-State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (W-SARA).  Retrieved from http://www.wiche.edu/sara

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